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2018 South Carolina Best Places to Work

on August 16, 2018

ATI named one of South Carolina’s Best Places to Work 2018!

For the second consecutive year, the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce named ATI one of South Carolina’s Best Places to Work! The Best Places to Work program identifies and recognizes South Carolina’s best employers using a two-part assessment process, which includes an Employer Questionnaire about our policies, practices, benefits, and demographics combined with in-depth anonymous satisfaction survey completed by our team members.

ATI was recognized for our exceptional program and retirement company match, as well as our competitive paid time off, paid holidays, and company-wide suspension of operations during the traditional December holiday period.  ATI was also commended for our generous paid Volunteer Time Off (VTO) program and flexible schedule and work-from-home policies.

ATI’s team members enjoy our culture of health and wellness, including our on-site yoga and pilates classes during lunch, nearby walking trails, and stand-sit workstations.  Similarly, the accessibility of senior leadership (including monthly employee lunches with the President and CEO), transparency about company initiatives, and ample development opportunities make ATI a leader in employee engagement within South Carolina.

Thank you to the ATI family for sharing your feedback and making ATI one of SC’s Best Places to Work! We are honored to have such an outstanding, hardworking team!

2017 Halloween Celebration

The ATI team enjoyed a festive Halloween celebration, including a costume contest and cubicle-decorating contest.

ATI Team Members on the Blue & BBQ Harbor Cruise

The ATI family gathered for a blues and BBQ cruise on Charleston Harbor!

2017 Day of Caring

ATI team members spent the 2017 Day of Caring helping out at Jerry Zucker Middle School in North Charleston, SC.

2018 South Carolina Best Places to Work

Success Story: NAC-DOTC

on July 24, 2018

Latest and Greatest

Other Transaction collaborations bring the Federal Government up-to-speed on industry’s newest technologies.

One of great benefits of the Other Transaction-consortium model is the collaboration between government and industry that can take place. Often these discussions help industry understand the government’s technology needs, and the government gets rare insight into industry’s latest capabilities. Recently, this paid off big time for both DoD and industry members of the National Armaments Consortium…

When the Army needed new armaments technology ideas to replace existing mine capabilities, they reached out to the government’s Department of Defense Ordnance Technology Consortium (DOTC) and the ATI-managed National Armaments Consortium (NAC). Alongside DOTC, we organized an Industry Day where government and industry membership exchanged technical know-how, discussed industry armaments abilities and new ideas, and refined the Army’s project requirements.

The Industry Day resulted in three (3) prototyping agreements through DOTC for innovative armaments technologies, representing opportunities to significantly improve the effectiveness of our armaments systems. ATI’s other consortia facilitate similar collaborations with the government that lead to equally meaningful results.

Success Story: NAC-DOTC

Current OTAs

on July 9, 2018

Other Transaction Agreements Today

There are 23 Other Transaction (OT) authority consortia currently providing the government with access to diverse range of cutting-edge research and prototypes.

Last post, we gave a quick run-down of Other Transaction Agreements (OTA) and how they work. Today, we’ll show you how they’re being used by the government to access innovation.

Other Transaction (OT) authority is currently used to bring research findings and prototypes from industry to the federal market in areas as diverse as biotechnology, electromagnetic spectrum uses, and armaments technology. Other Transaction Agreements (OTA) enable quicker technology and prototype acquisitions, bringing solutions to end users sooner.

OTs also create a long-term channel for the government to collect industry input and feedback on rapidly evolving technologies. The collaborative nature of this model and its emphasis on engaging nontraditional technology suppliers casts a wider net for capturing ideas and innovations than available under the FAR.

For participating companies, the model lets them weigh-in on critical technology issues and gives them a voice to inform government technology requirements.  The Other Transaction (OT) authority consortium fosters technology transition partnerships between small technology innovators and large system integrators. And its agile contracting features help government meet obligation benchmarks.

ATI has emerged as the leader in OTA collaborations.

Of the 23 Other Transaction (OT) authority consortia in operation today, ATI performs consortium management services for eleven of them.

The number of active OTA collaborations is growing and that growth is accelerating. in 1998 there was 1 active OTA collaboration. Today there are 23. ATI manages 11.Join us next time for some one-stop shopping using Other Transaction Agreements!

Current OTAs

Success Story: ATI & VLC

on June 25, 2018

Teaming Up

By facilitating teaming, ATI and the Vertical Lift Consortium help industry respond quickly to government needs for critical technologies.

One of our clients, the US Army Aviation Development Directorate Science and Technology Program recently had an urgent need for project ideas that would help them figure out their needs for the Future Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System (FTUAS). Their goal was to find out what technologies from industry they could incorporate into the FTUAS when replacing a legacy Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System.

The Army came to the ATI-managed Vertical Lift Consortium (VLC), asking VLC members to form teams and send in short summaries of their project ideas (called whitepapers) for five separate Topic Areas of Interest in less than 30 days. The Army released the request to ATI and the VLC on July 5, 2017. To help build these teams and meet the quick turnaround the Army needed, we hosted a series of five Speed Networking Webinar events on July 11 and 12 that let VLC members find partners with capabilities in the needed technology areas. In Speed Networking sessions, each participant gets a few minutes in the spotlight to tell the rest of the group what their company does and their areas of technical expertise. Contact information is shared between members, and companies reach out and build teams when members have capabilities that complement each other.

VLC members submitted their project ideas to the Army on August 1, and four of the six teams selected by the government for award were formed through the Speed Networking Webinars we hosted. By introducing these companies to one another, ATI led meaningful teambuilding that helped VLC members realize business opportunities, introduced the Army groundbreaking ideas, and eventually delivered critical technologies to Warfighters.

Success Story: ATI & VLC

Other Transaction Agreement

on June 6, 2018

The Fast and the Tedious

Other Transaction Agreements streamline government technology acquisitions

U.S. industry moves fast:  profit motive, anxiety over competition, and constant advances in technology drive rapid evolution. In industry, you move fast or you move aside.  Innovation propels companies; tradition holds them back. That’s both the perception and the reality.

The government, especially the DoD, needs to quickly buy and apply new ideas, processes, and technologies, but too often the rules get in the way.  Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR)-based acquisitions are designed to minimize the government’s risk in acquiring products and services.

Unfortunately, this traditional acquisition model can be cumbersome, limiting government access to the latest technologies available from industry. The complexity of navigating the FAR excludes participation by “nontraditional” contractors—businesses offering innovative technology solutions, but lacking the contracting resources and experience necessary to work with the government.

Challenges using FAR-based contracting ultimately led certain government sponsors to look outside the FAR for a solution and to charter an enterprise partnership using the Other Transaction (OT) consortium model, a streamlined alternative to the FAR.

Other Transaction authority has been around for a while: the model originated in 1958 at the advent of the Space Age. The Russian launch of the Sputnik satellite in 1957 kicked off a new era in human history and spurred the United States into action.  For the US to catch up, NASA needed to develop unprecedented technologies—and fast. Congress created the first Other Transaction authority as a contractual tool that NASA could use to acquire and apply breakthrough technologies from industry to counter Russia’s head-start in the Space Race.

Today, OTs are used to bring research findings and prototypes from industry to the federal market in areas as diverse as biotechnology, electromagnetic spectrum, and armaments.

In the coming months, we’ll be explaining the Other Transaction (OT)-consortium model through a comprehensive series of eleven posts that will bring you up to speed on how ATI uses Other Transaction authority to bring innovation to government. Up next: a quick run-down of OTs and how they work.

Other Transaction Agreement